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  • Leslie Marshall
    Leslie Marshall

    Leslie Marshall

    • United States of America
    • Radio Talk show Host
    • The Leslie Marshall Show & Fox News Channel
    • 0 followers

    Leslie Marshall replied 27th Apr '16:

    I guess it depends on who you ask. Snowden's considered a hero or a traitor depending on which American you ask. Putting a spotlight on issues within our government in D.C. made him a household name. But now, with the election, many have forgotten him. And, although there was a push for transparency; ISIS and the election seem to have moved Mr Snowden, and even his issue(s) to the back burner; at least for now. So, was having the guts to be a whistleblower worth it? If you like living in Russia and never want to come back to the U.S., I guess the answer is yes. But for many, Snowden's fifteen minutes of fame have passed; and our government is back to business as usual.

Comments

In hindsight, it does seem to have been the unwise thing for Mr Snowden to have done, but then again, because fame is such a craved-for commodity in a world where you run the risk of living and dying as an insignificant "nobody," it might have been a golden decision.

There is a story of a bailiff, who on realising that he was about to be fired by his boss, altered the value of what he was to collect from those in debt, in their favour, in an attempt to gain favour with them in the case he would need their support, even if morally, after being terminated.

We should ask what was going on with Snowden's job expectations and satisfaction. Like the bailiff, Snowden's transgression might have been self-serving. The difference is that the bailiff's decision might have put well needed extra food on the tables of his assigned debtors, whilst Snowden's just confirmed what the more astute among us suspected already. We do not need the proof that U.S is "extraordinary," and have become and remained so through doing extraordinary things.

And to all those "insignificant nobodies" out there, as a psychiatric patient, and the accused, told his presiding judge, "remember, Jesus loves you." If that's crazy, then as a songwriter put it, it's crazy faith.

Andre Sheppy
Jamaica

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