Answers

  • Dana Khalili
    Dana Khalili

    Dana Khalili

    • Jordan
    • Philosophy
    • Director- Media & Communications at Wamar International, LLC
    • 10 followers

    Dana Khalili replied 10th Feb '16:

    Loyalty and integrity are deeply entwined. As one peels back the layers of the two, the interconnectedness of their core becomes apparent. Take for example the statement that a disloyal person lacks integrity. To understand this, one might consider the definitions of loyalty. Loyalty as a value is incomplete if it does not contain the qualities of truth and honesty. In fact, at in essence, loyalty rings true when at its very heart, pain can be felt. Pain of perhaps honesty, or tough love from a loved one, all with the intention of personal growth. Words that may be seen as harsh, are in fact sincere; making loyalty an act of integrity. One needs to be loyal to ones own beliefs in order to be a part of an honest relationship that has integrity. In this way, it is clear that loyalty in itself is an act of subjective integrity, and integrity an act of persistent loyalty.

Comments

I prefer integrity though. Loyalty dies with the death of the receiver and the giver of it, whilst integrity lives on forever in others who had and hadn't seen it.

Andre
Jamaica
2017

Dana, your answer had quite a bit of "gymnastics" there. Left me blurting out,"Huh?" But I kind of saw where you were coming from, more so than where you were heading.

A great man once said to some of his most faithful of his disciples, "the heart is willing but the flesh is weak;" this was as they repeatedly fell asleep on their expected watch. You could say that "the heart" represents LOYALTY, and "the flesh," INTEGRITY. Now if he, who was so great, perhaps the greatest ever, made this deduction, then how then can the reverse be obtained?

It was him, same one, who suggested that with faith, in God that is, all things are possible. Faith, however, may be had through the use of certain substances or when in certain states of mind.
The crucifixion of this said man, who was supposed to "save" his people, represented the end to that hope, expectation and "promise." It would have appeared that his loyalty to His Heavenly Father, and His commandment to offer Himself up as a sacrifice trumped the prophetic promise to His people. Millenia later, we are yet to have that promise honoured with His second coming (a subsequent promise). In contrary, only faith can allow integrity to come to fulfillment in this case.

Andre
Jamaica
2017

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