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  • myreplyis.com

    myreplyis.com asked in Applied Sciences 1st Nov '17:

    A number of countries are redefining their educational objectives for the 21st century?. From your perspective, which aspects of the current education system need redefining the most?.

    James Laughlin replied 31st Jul '18:

    In my opinion, it is important to facilitate interdisciplinary dialog. In most countries, there is very little, if any, fruitful interaction between the sciences and the humanities. Even within the sciences, there seems to be a hierarchy: the pure sciences are placed above the applied sciences. Curiously, however, the latter is more lucrative, and more students opt to become engineers and developers. As a result, we do not have enough researchers and scholars.
    We must aim to bridge the gap between STEM education and humanities education. This is very important to encourage critical thinking and discourage rote learning. Doing so may encourage more students to take up research.

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  • myreplyis.com

    myreplyis.com asked in Social Sciences 12th Jul '18:

    Transgender communities are more evident around the world. Do societies equate transgender rights with gay rights?. Where is the divide, is there a divide?.

    James Laughlin replied 30th Jul '18:

    The gay community and the transgender community are often clubbed together using the "LGBTQ" tag. Some argue that the "Q" (for queer) in the "LGBTQ" tag will include L, G, B, and T. But this has been widely contested. Some lesbians groups, for instance, argue that transgenders (male-to-females and cross-dressers) are not females. They tend to find it offensive when transgenders claim to be women. This has given rise to terms such as "anti-trans feminism" and "anti-trans lesbianism."

    In short, it is problematic to club transgenders and gays/lesbians together. Some think it is necessary to do so, whereas others vehemently oppose this move. Yet, it has been done. In fact, it is being done. There is no correct classification. It just depends on whether your argument for a particular classification can withstand immense logical and political scrutiny.

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